Dr. Gary L. Wolfram, an adjunct scholar at the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, is the George Munson Professor of political economy at Hillsdale College in Hillsdale, Michigan, and president of the Hillsdale Policy Group, a consulting firm specializing in taxation and public policy analysis. He is the author of A Capitalist Manifesto: Understanding the Market Economy and Defending Liberty (2012).

His government experience includes a stint as Washington chief of staff for Michigan Congressman Nick Smith, being senior economist for the Michigan State Republican policy staff, and serving as Michigan's deputy state treasurer for taxation and economic policy.

One of the highlights of Wolfram's government service was directing the establishment of Michigan's Enterprise Zone legislation. He also served as chairman of the Headlee Amendment Blue Ribbon Commission.

Dr. Wolfram earned his Ph.D. at the University of California-Berkeley, and he has taught at several colleges and universities, including Mt. Holyoke College, The University of Michigan, and Washington State University.

Governor’s Auto Insurance Proposal Worth Considering

Commentary: Michigan Stands Out on High Cost of Car Insurance

Reforming Michigan’s Auto Insurance Industry

Reforming Michigan’s Auto Insurance Industry

Michigan auto insurance premiums are among the highest in the nation. The American Association of Retired Persons, in a recent survey, found that Michigan’s premiums were the second highest in the nation, behind only Louisiana. This, combined with a statutory requirement to purchase insurance, has led to legislative attempts to keep premiums down. Unfortunately, state lawmakers have pursued an approach that includes price controls, regulation of how premiums may be set, and requirements for insurance companies to provide specific types of coverage. As the famous Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises pointed out decades ago, this kind of government intervention, while well-intended, leads to unintended consequences that then lead to further government interventions, further unintended consequences, in a lengthy cycle with results that no legislator would have expected at the beginning.
Rather than attempting to regulate insurance company and individual behavior, Michigan legislators would much better serve the people they represent by examining why insurance premiums are so high in the first place, in order to address the problem at its source. A careful study of Michigan’s insurance market and the regulations governing it indicates that no-fault insurance and the legislative requirement for individuals to purchase unlimited personal injury protection are two important reasons for the increased costs of providing insurance coverage in Michigan. The good news is that it is possible to reduce these costs and reduce the number of drivers who take the risk of violating the law and do not purchase insurance. … more

Ballot Proposals Cast a Pall on Michigan

Michigan’s Russian Roulette

The governor’s five-year plan does not include reducing the cost of producing goods and services in Michigan — something that would attract industries trying to compete globally. Instead, the plan is built around the 21st Century Jobs Fund and other state programs that substitute central planning for the market process. … more

The State of the Michigan Economy